CategoryHealth

Relive Your Youth By Undergoing Laser Wrinkle Reduction

From the studies, it is evident that the number of cosmetic procedures has been increased by 9 million in a decade. These days there is a lot of craze among people for looking young and beautiful and thus hundreds of dermatologists, plastic surgery centers, skin care products are available in the market. Earlier cosmetic laser surgery was said to be meant for the upscale cosmopolitan market. However, the situation has been totally changed in today’s scenario. Now, it is quite common among average skin care regimen.

Cosmetic laser treatment helps in diminishing skin hyperpigmentation, stretch marks, spider veins, scars., etc. Now, the treatment also works for the fine lines and wrinkle reduction.

Laser resurfacing: wrinkle reduction through Laser is possible with a procedure termed as laser resurfacing. This is a non-invasive cosmetic procedure which uses high intensity Laser light. This high energy light targets the fine lines and wrinkles of the skin.

How it works?

The use of laser technology completely depends upon the use of lines and wrinkles. Depending upon the depth, laser is targeted to the area to be treated. The high energy of the beam will destroy the old skin cells. Along with this, new skin cells are pushed upwards and outwards. The treatment also causes the collagen production and skin tightening in the skin. The newly formed collagen will fill the wrinkles and thus reducing their appearance.

Effectiveness:

When it comes to Laser wrinkle reduction, nobody doubts its effectiveness. Everyone is concerned with the quickness of the desired results. This depends on the depth and amount of the fine lines and wrinkles. Every visit takes 30 minutes to 1 hour. How frequently you have to visit will be decided by the depth of the wrinkles. Every treatment requires some post laser healing time which may be about 30 days of ointment application care.

Laser treatment does not cause any pain, only a slight pinch is observed when the laser light is focused on the skin.

Sources of laser treatment:

The high demand and popularity of the treatment has attracted the attention of the department of public health. This way a lot of cosmetic treatments are setting up day by day providing satisfactory solutions. However, one must keep in mind that not every spa, cosmetic center or medical clinic is suitable for undergoing this treatment.

Though laser wrinkle reduction method is quite safe and effective but there are few of the side effects of the process like skin discoloration, swelling, puffiness, redness, etc. All these effects are very minute and wither away in a week or two. But if some inexperienced hands will perform the therapy for you, you can experience severe side effects of the same.

Laser therapy has proved its effectiveness since ages and is widely used as laser hair reduction, Laser Photo facial, tattoo removal, etc.

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What to Look for in a Home Health Care Provider

Anyone in need of home health care deserves non-medical care or in home medical care that is compassionate whether the patient is a child, adult or elder. Home health care services are provided anywhere except for in nursing homes or a hospital. These services may even be provided at an assisted living facility, a school, apartment or house.

As far as care plans go, there are a wide variety of personal care and nursing services that are not just available, they are tailored for the needs of each individual recipient. Customized care plans and follow up assessments should be provided by a registered nurse.

Nursing Supervision and Case Management

The care that is provided by personal care assistants and home health aides is typically supervised by a registered nurse. One of these registered nurses should be on call at all times in order to assist the caregivers as well as to provide medical training and oversight and to implement the plans of care.

Elder or Adult Care

Are you aware of the fact that 75% of the health care costs in the US are incurred by only 12% of Americans? These people generally have some type of chronic illness. The benefits of this type of individualized home care include much more than just being able to keep someone at home for their illness as opposed to being institutionalized or put in a long term care facility. As far as cost goes, home care visits are roughly only 10% of what a single day in the hospital will cost.

Additionally, home health care has a track record that has been proven when it comes to things such as reducing readmissions to the hospital, expensive visits to the emergency room and in managing chronic illnesses. In addition, there is scientific evidence that has proven that patients are able to heal faster when they are in their own homes. Both morbidity and mortality rates are reduced in patients who take advantage of home health care. In fact, 90% of seniors facing long term care in nursing homes prefer to stay home and get the services of a home health care provider.

Private Elder Care Coordination, Planning and Management

This involves both advising and then assisting families when it comes to determining the necessities of an aging adult. These caregivers are able to navigate many of the long term type of care resources that are available in your area. The goal here is to educate and inform the family of what the options are and them to assist them with the implementation of their decision. Typically this is done by an RN who has been certified and specially trained in the area of geriatrics who can provide:

  • The services of being a liaison for family members who may live a great distance away
  • Educating and advocating for the patient
  • Assisting with paperwork and forms that are related to insurance, medical assistant and Medicare
  • Screening, arranging for and then monitoring any in home help or options for institutional or residential care options
  • Care planning that is tailored to the patient

In the long run home health care is a compassionate and caring choice for anyone who needs care and wishes to remain in their own home.

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Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) When, How, and Why to Supplement

Pyridoxine (B6)

Sources and Physiologic Functions Sources: Poultry, fish, liver, and eggs are good sources of this vitamin; meat and milk contain lesser amounts. Pyridoxine in animal sources is 96% bioavailable. Vitamin B6 can be made by intestinal bacteria in healthy persons. Plant foods such as legumes, peanuts, potatoes, yeast, bananas, corn, cabbage, yams, prunes, watermelon, and avocados also contain this vitamin.

Populations at risk: As this vitamin is widely distributed, deficiency is rare except in chronic alcoholics and among women taking oral contraceptives. Elderly persons and infants of preeclamptic mothers or mothers deficient in B6 are at risk. Patients on Cycloserine, hydantoin, hydralazine, isoniazid, and penicillamine should be given B6 supplementation. High protein diet increases the needs of this vitamin.

Severe deficiencies of vitamin B6 are rare, but mild deficiencies are extremely common. Dietary data from Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II) in 11,658 adults aged 19-74 y showed that 71% of males and 90% of females consumed less than the 1980 recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of vitamin B6. Vitamin B6 is the most common deficient water soluble vitamin in elderly. Single drug and drug combinations taken by elderly individuals may impose nutritional risk. Unwanted outcomes of drug-food and drug-nutrient interactions can be minimized by instructing elderly men and women and their caregivers to avoid timing errors in drug-taking behavior and toxic reactions due to food incompatibility. In addition, drug-induced nutritional deficiencies can be avoided by advising drug-taking elderly on the appropriate levels of nutrient intake. In a study which compared the nutrient intakes of American children aged 2 to 10 years, vitamin B6 was found to be below the RDA in more than 50% of the population.

Birth control pill usage and occupational exposure to carbon disulfide induce vitamin B6 deficiency and/or enhance vitamin B6 requirement. Both compounds cause adverse psychological/neurological disorders such as extreme irritability, manic depressive tendencies, headaches, and other variables, but related disorders presumably by disrupting normal vitamin B6 metabolism and vitamin B6 administration has been found to alleviate their adverse psychological symptoms. Further studies are needed to experimentally evaluate this interrelation. Conjoined exposure to OCs and CS2 may result in an enhanced disruption of tryptophan metabolism which may in turn cause exaggerated psychological sequelae associated with CS2 exposure.

Signs and Symptoms of Deficiency: In infants, convulsive seizures and hyperactivity are the usual presenting symptoms. Diarrhea is also common. Anemia and peripheral neuritis are seen in tuberculosis patients on isoniazid who develop pyridoxine deficiency. 20-30% of homocystinuric patients with dislocation of the lens of the eye, osteoporosis (brittle spine), mental retardation, and a tendency for spontaneous blood clots that can lead to heart attacks and death, respond to vitamin B6 therapy.

Biochemistry: Vitamin B6 isa collective term for pyridoxine, pyridoxal, and pyridoxamine, all of which serve as precursors of the biologically active coenzyme, pyridoxal phosphate. Pyridoxal phosphate functions as a coenzyme that catalyze reactions in protein metabolism, conversion of tryptophan to niacin, fat metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, folic acid synthesis, glandular and endocrine functions, and for the nerve and brain energy. Vitamin B6 has a clear benefit in lessening the severity of homocystinuria, a rare disease that usually results from a defect in an enzyme used for degrading homocysteine.

Safety: Deficient and excess intakes of pyridoxine can produce neurologic disturbances. Most cases of sensory neuropathy have resulted from intakes of over 600 mg/day, but some evidence suggests that it may result from doses as low as 300-500 mg/d and that the total exposure over time is the determinant of toxicity. There is one report that a daily intake of 117 mg/day (on average) for 2.9 years may be related to some toxicity. In the same study however, the control group that did not get any neuropathy had an average intake of 116 mg/day for an average of 1.6 years, and some women in both groups had been taking as little as 50 mg/day, questioning the accuracy of the telephone survey method used to determine neuropathy.

Vitamin B6 is toxic at doses that are 1000 times the RDA. Daily doses of 2 to 5 g of pyridoxine can produce difficulty in walking and tingling sensations in the legs and soles of the feet. Continued consumption of the toxic dose results in further unsteadiness of walking, difficulty in handling small objects, and numbness and clumsiness of the hands. Where vitamin B6 supplementation is stopped, recovery begins after 2 months. Complete recovery may occur after 2 to 3 years of discontinuing consumption of the vitamin B6 supplements. One study showed development of pure central-peripheral distal axonopathy with pyridoxine abuse. Pyridoxine dose was 0.2 to 5 g/d, and duration of consumption before symptoms was inversely proportional to the daily intake. In all patients with adequate follow-up, improvement followed discontinuation of pyridoxine.

Is pyridoxine safe for long-term use in large segments of the population, including children? It would appear from retrospective analysis of several studies that pyridoxine is safe at doses of 100mg/day or less in adults. In children, there is not enough data to make any sort of suggestion. Because the major neurologic complication is a peripheral neuropathy, and the causes of this condition are myriad, pyridoxine may cause neuropathy only in patients with a pre-existing susceptibility to this condition. Family histories, drugs, alcohol, nutritional status, and toxic exposure at home or in the work place may all be predisposing factors which, in combination with pyridoxine, produce the peripheral neuropathy that is not seen in other patients taking the same dosages. The duration of exposure that causes neuropathy is still a major question. Extremely high doses cause neurologic injury within a few days, and chronic low doses seem relatively safe.

Deterioration of acne vulgaris or eruption of an acneiform exanthema was demonstrated during treatment with vitamin B6 and/or vitamin B12 in 14 patients. Females were, by far, the more frequently affected. The appearance of skin symptoms, even outside the age groups typically affected by acne vulgaris, is characteristic. The clinical appearance of acneiform exanthema occurring during treatment with vitamin B6 or B12 consists of loosely disseminated small papules or papulopustules on the face (especially on the forehead and chin), on the upper parts of the back and chest, and spreading to the upper arm. The pathogensis of the change is not yet certain. The acneiform rash generally fades within a short time after vitamin B6 or vitamin B12 treatment has been stopped.

Recommendations: RDA in mg.

  • Infants birth to 6 mos – 0.3mg  
  • Infants 6 mos to 1 yr – 0.6mg  
  • Children 1 yr to 3 yr – 1.0mg  
  • Children 4 yr to 6 yr – 1.1mg  
  • Children 7 yr to 10 yr – 1.4mg  
  • Adolescent males 11yr to 14 yr – 1.7mg  
  • Adolescent females 11 yr to 14 yr – 1.4 mg  
  • Adolescent males 15 yr to 18 yr – 2.0mg  
  • Adolescent females 15 yr to 18 yr – 1.5mg  
  • Adult males 19 yr to 50 yr – 2.0mg  
  • Adult females 19 yr to 50 yr – 1.6mg  
  • Adult males 51 yr plus – 2.0mg  
  • Adult females 51 yr plus – 1.6mg  
  • Pregnant Women – 2.2mg  
  • Lactating Mothers (1st 6 months) – 2.1mg  
  • Lactating Mothers (2nd 6 months) – 2.1mg  

Pyridoxine B6

Food Source Serving Size/Amount # of mg/serving

Chicken (dark meat) 3.5 oz 0.37 mg

Chicken (light meat) 3.5 oz 0.63 mg

Atlantic Salmon (wild, raw) 3.0 oz 0.70 mg

Tuna (canned in water) 3.0 oz 0.30 mg

Liver (beef braised) 3.5 oz 0.91 mg

Live (veal braised 3.5 oz 0.91 mg

Navy beans (boiled) 1 cup 0.30 mg

Peanuts (dry roasted) 1 oz 0.07 mg

Potato (boiled) 1 medium 0.40 mg

Banana 1 medium 0.66 mg

Prunes (dried) 10 0.22 mg

Watermelon 1 cup 0.23 mg

Avocado 1 medium 0.48 mg

The Literature: Heart disease Prevention:

Homocysteine

Hyperhomocysteinemia, a risk factor for atherosclerosis, is associated with deficiencies of vitamin B6, folate, and cobalamin. Patients who were given vitamin B6 for carpal tunnel syndrome and other degenerative diseases were found to have 27% of the risk of developing acute cardiac chest pain or myocardial infarction, compared with patients who had not taken vitamin B6. Dr. Ellis found that among his elderly patients expiring at home, the average age at death from myocardial infarction was 8 years later in those who had taken vitamin B6, compared with those who had not taken vitamin B6. The preventive effect of vitamin B6 on progression of coronary heart disease may be related to increased formation of pyridoxal phosphate, the coenzyme that is required for catabolism of the atherogenic amino acid, homocysteine.

The total homocysteine (tHcy) level in the serum is related to pregnancy complications, neural tube defects, mental disorder, and cognitive impairment in the elderly. In addition, over 80 clinical and epidemiological studies provide ample evidence that an elevated tHcy level is a common cardiovascular risk factor. Oral treatment with pyridoxine up to 300mg/d does not lower the fasting tHcy level in healthy subjects or vascular patients. However, pyridoxine (10 – 250 mg/d) lowers an abnormal postmethionine load tHcy level in most patients and, when combined with folic acid, nearly all obtain a normal postmethionine tHcy level.

Platelet aggregation:

In a randomized trial, Pyridoxine inhibited ADP- or epinephrine-induced aggregation by 48% and 41% (p < 0.001), respectively. It also prolonged both bleeding and coagulation time. Pyridoxine significantly reduced total plasma lipid and cholesterol levels, whereas it enhanced HDL-cholesterol level. Thus, it is suggested that oral vitamin B6 inhibits platelet aggregation in normal subjects.

Essential Hypertension:

In a study, treatment of hypertensive patients with pyridoxine significantly reduced systolic (p < 0.01) and diastolic blood pressure (p < 0.005), plasma NE (p < 0.005), and E (p < 0.05) within 4 weeks. The dose of pyridoxine used in these patients was 5 mg/kg body weight/d. Thus, pyridoxine may be beneficial in the treatment of hypertension.

Neurotransmitter Production

Pyridoxine has been known as an essential cofactor in the production of neurotransmitters. For this reason, it has been considered a therapeutic adjunct in a variety of conditions with known or suspected neurotransmitter abnormalities. Among these conditions are seizures, Parkinson’s disease, depression, chronic pain, headache, behavior abnormalities of adults and children, and peripheral neuropathy. Other clinical uses for pyridoxine include treatment of premenstrual syndrome and carpal tunnel syndrome. The potential neurotoxicity of pyridoxine makes it essential that vitamin intake be included as part of medical history.

Diabetic neuropathy:

Vitamin B6 has been recommended in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. Vitamin B6 deficiency was thought to be the causative factor for neuropathy in diabetes. However, several studies show that vitamin B6 supplements may not be beneficial in these patients. In one of these studies, 18 patients with symptomatic diabetic neuropathy were treated with placebo or pyridoxine. After 4 months of follow-up, there was no difference between the two groups with regard to fasting plasma glucose, motor nerve conduction velocity, or ophthalmologic examination at the beginning or at the conclusion of the study. These results suggest that vitamin B6 deficiency is not a factor in the etiology of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

Gestational diabetes:

In a study of 14 pregnant women with gestational diabetes, a relative pyridoxine deficiency was thought to exist. After treatment with vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) 100 mg/day for 14 days, the oral glucose tolerance improved considerably. It was hypothesized that increased xanthurenic-acid synthesis during pregnancy may cause gestational diabetes. Treatment with vitamin B6 makes the production of xanthurenic-acid normal by restoring tryptophan metabolism and improves the oral glucose tolerance in patients with gestational diabetes.

Kidney Stones:

Weak evidence suggests that pyridoxine may be useful in the therapy of kidney stones. Twelve recurrent stone formers with hyperoxaluria were administered pyridoxine-HCl (10 mg/day) daily for a period of 180 days. Urinary oxalate decreased significantly (p less than 0.05) by the 90th day of pyridoxine therapy, and thus, pyridoxine in low doses (10 mg/day) is of therapeutic value for hyperoxaluric stone formers.

Autism:

A review of four therapeutic crossed-sequential double-blind trials with 60 autistic children examined the effects of vitamin B6 alone, magnesium alone, and in combination on behavioral improvement. Modest behavioral improvement was observed among children taking both magnesium and B6, but not when either one of those taken alone.

Cognitive Development

Vitamin B6 is an essential cofactor in the developing central nervous system and may influence brain development and cognitive function. Recent work in animal models suggests that vitamin B6 deficiency during gestation and lactation alters the function of receptors thought to play an important role in learning and memory. A deficiency of vitamin B6 during brain development has been shown to result in neurochemical and morphological changes that are expressed behaviorally as tremors, irritability, abnormalities in motor function, and spontaneous seizures, although the specific mechanism is still not understood. Numerous studies have suggested that pregnant and lactating women may have dietary intakes of vitamin B6 that are well below the recommended dietary allowance, which may affect the vitamin B6 status of their offspring. Reports indicate that unsupplemented lactating mothers have a milk vitamin B6 level that, in some cases, is lower than 100 μg/L, a concentration that places infants at risk of development of seizures. Although this level of vitamin B6 in milk does not always result in clinical signs of frank vitamin B6 deficiency, it may influence the normal development of the child. Evidence for such an effect was noted in an Egyptian study where abnormalities in behavior were observed in infants whose mothers had vitamin B6 levels in milk below 85 mg/L.

Thus, many conditions in clinical neurology may be responsive to pyridoxine as a therapeutic agent. The observations that serotonin deficiency is a common thread in patients with headache, chronic pain, and depression, and that pyridoxine can raise serotonin levels open a wide range of therapeutic options. Comparison with amitriptyline in the treatment of headache appears to show about equal efficacy, although side effects would be expected to be more of a problem with the amitriptyline. Some medical authorities have taken this so far as to suggest that many of the behavioral disorder problems are caused by “toxic” exposures to chemicals that are pyridoxine antagonists and that supplementation at early stages may reduce the incidence of hyperactivity and aggressive behavior.

Interaction with Medications

Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) supplementation during isoniazid (INH) therapy is necessary in some patients to prevent the development of peripheral neuropathy. In vivo pyridoxine is converted into coenzymes which play an essential role in the metabolism of protein, carbohydrates, fatty acids, and several other substances, including brain amines. INH apparently competitively inhibits the action of pyridoxine in these metabolic functions. The routine use of pyridoxine supplementation to prevent peripheral neuropathy in high risk populations is recommended.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Vitamin B6 is effective in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome and related disorders in patients with vitamin B6 deficiency. A study found that higher plasma pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) concentrations, particularly in unsupplemented males, appeared to be associated with less frequent pain/discomfort, tingling and nocturnal awakening. In contrast, higher vitamin C concentrations or a relative deficit of plasma PLP in comparison to the plasma vitamin C (higher ASC/PLP ratio) were, in some analyses, associated with greater sensory latencies or with more prevalent and frequent symptoms. This raises the possibility that vitamin C supplementation in the presence of vitamin B6 deficit might be injurious to the median nerve and thus promote the development of the hand/wrist symptoms of CTS. Thus, there are significant relationships between plasma vitamin levels and both components of CTS (specific symptoms and median nerve slowing). The interaction between plasma PLP and ASC appears to be particularly important with respect to symptoms. Hence, vitamin B6 is commonly recommended for carpal tunnel syndrome.

Premenstrual Syndrome

A review of 12 controlled trials on vitamin B6 in the treatment of the premenstrual syndrome showed a weak evidence of positive effects of vitamin B6. A major drawback of the trials is the limited number of patients included. In a more recent well designed study, 120 women were randomized to receive active drug or placebo. Pyridoxine at 300 mg/d showed no greater benefit compared to placebo in symptom reduction.

Vitamin B6 and Exercise

Vitamin B6 may play an important role in exercise response. Vitamin B6 is essential to the production of energy during exercise. If vitamin B6 status is poor, exercise performance may be impaired. Vitamin B6 supplementation may increase the levels of plasma growth hormone during exercise and immediately following exercise. The physiologic significance of these changes has not been explored but are thought to increase muscle mass and reduce body fat. Female athletes and those who participate in sports which emphasize low body weights (e.g., dancers, wrestlers, gymnasts and runners) may be prone to low dietary vitamin B6 intakes.

Asthma:

Weak evidence suggests that vitamin B6 may be useful in asthma. A double-blind study with 76 asthmatic children followed for five months indicated significant improvement in asthma following pyridoxine therapy (200 mg daily) and reduction in dosage of bronchodilators and cortisone. The data suggest that these children with severe bronchial asthma had a metabolic block in tryptophan metabolism, which was benefitted by long-term treatment with large doses of pyridoxine. In another double-blind placebo-controlled trial, 31 patients requiring steroids (oral or inhaled) for the treatment of their asthma received pyridoxine 300 mg per day or placebo. After a 9 week follow-up, treatment with oral pyridoxine failed to improve the outcome variables in patients requiring steroids for the treatment of their asthma.

Depression:

Weak evidence suggests that vitamin B6 may be beneficial in the treatment of depression. The augmentation effect of 10 mg each of vitamins B1, B2, and B6 in 14 geriatric inpatients with depression who were treated with tricyclic antidepressant treatment was assessed in a well-designed study. The vitamin treated group showed trends toward greater improvement in scores on ratings of depression and cognitive function, as well as in serum nortriptyline levels compared with placebo-treated subjects. Thus, B complex vitamin augmentation in the treatment of geriatric depression should be considered.

Summary: Pyridoxine is essential for protein, fat and carbohydrate metabolism, folic acid synthesis, glandular and endocrine function. It is also essential for the formation of serotonin, and dopamine, and aids in the formation of several neurotransmitters and is therefore, an essential nutrient in the regulation of mental processes and the mood.

A number of claims have been made about the beneficial effects of vitamin B6 on numerous conditions: atherosclerosis, attention deficit disorder, autism, alcohol withdrawal syndrome, diabetes, fibrocystic breast disease, carpal tunnel syndrome, chemotherapy, HIV patients, nephrolithiasis, osteoporosis, photosensitivity, retinopathy, and canker sores.

Evidence strongly suggests that vitamin B6 has a preventive effect in the progression of coronary artery disease. Although it did not show any effect in lowering the fasting plasma homocysteine level, vitamin B6 supplementation is shown to lower postmethionine load tHcy, which might be the reason for its cardioprotective effect.

In well done studies it has shown efficacy on par with amitriptyline in the treatment of chronic headaches. Many clinical conditions like chronic pain and depression, which are caused by serotonin deficiency, might benefit from vitamin B6 therapy. As it functions as an essential cofactor in the production of several neurotransmitters, it may be considered a therapeutic adjunct in the treatment of several conditions like seizures, Parkinson’s disease, behavioral abnormalities of adults and children, and peripheral neuropathy. Vitamin B6 is also found to be effective in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with vitamin B6 deficiency. Exercise performance is improved with vitamin B6 supplementation.

Populations who are prone to be deficient in this vitamin such as chronic alcoholics, women on oral contraceptives, patients on Isoniazid, and athletes should receive supplementation. Pregnant and lactating women should consume adequate amounts of vitamin B6 in their diets for the normal development of central nervous system and cognitive function and for the prevention of abnormal behavioral development.

Our recommendations for adults is 40 mg/d, as there is weak evidence of some toxicity at 50 mg/d. Vitamin B6 is usually safe and can be consumed in amounts of 10-300 mg/d. Although side effects are rare, doses over 300 mg/d may result in adverse neurological outcomes. Pregnant and lactating women should not consume more than 100 mg/d. Vitamin B6 supplementation should be stopped immediately when sensory neuropathy with numbness in the hands and feet and/or difficulty in walking develops while on therapy.

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Sports Wheel Chairs – Three Types Described

Sports wheel chairs are amazing devices that give freedom to mobility challenged people who might not otherwise be physically able to play sports. These wheel chairs are anything but normal or traditional! They’re built especially for individual sports and are customized to exact specifications so they fit the athlete perfectly.

A sports wheel chair is lightweight, but is constructed in such a way that enables the athlete excellent mobility, stability, turning radius, and responsiveness. These chairs are designed with a low, folding back, quick-release wheels, and no armrests (to allow freedom of movement). Most weigh less than 30 pounds. Some athletes use their sports wheel chair on a daily basis given that these wheel chairs are easy to maneuver and transport.

Do you love to play soccer, basketball, volleyball, rugby, hockey or tennis? Do you love to race or ski? There is a sports wheel chair on the market today for just about every sport. The frames on sports chairs are designed specifically with aluminum frames that will endure strain and impact.

There are three styles of sports wheel chairs:
1) Racers – these amazing chairs are built for speed and weigh less than 20 pounds so you’ll go like the wind. Constructed with a horizontal frame and featuring front wheel cornering traction, a racing wheel chair can be tricked out with paint and emblems to look like a race car. Some racing chairs can be outfitted with a titanium seat frame to reduce the total weight of the chair by 3 pounds.

2) Handcycles – a handcycle looks much like a bicycle, but is customized with handlebars, footrests, and a comfortable seat to meet your physical needs and safety while riding. Handcycles allow you to enjoy the bike trails with your children or for exercise purposes. There are a number of wheel chair sports that employ handcycles as well.

3) Court wheel chairs – the wheels on these chairs often appear to be crooked, but in fact, the wheels angle in toward the athlete to provide excellent agility and maneuverability while on the court. A court chair works well on any court – basketball, tennis, or volleyball, to name a few.

Sports chairs are colorful and trendy and can be used for every day activities in addition to sporting events.

Why are sports wheel chairs important? Athletes, who stay active, despite their physical challenges, are much healthier and more confident than those who choose a more sedentary lifestyle. Research has shown that athletes in wheel chairs enjoy better motor skills, more flexibility, better heart health, better memory, and have amazing cardiovascular and muscular endurance.

Sports wheel chairs are not inexpensive and most times, are not covered by insurance companies. A sports chair can be as low as $500 or as high as $8,000, depending on the sport you want to play. Used sports chairs can be found, but because they’re customized to fit one person, it may be difficult to readjust the fit for a different athlete. However, it’s always worth a try if your budget is limited.

If you’ve never attended a wheel chair sporting event, go! You’ll be amazed at what these athletes can do when outfitted properly.

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Infrared Saunas – What Are They And What Do They Do?

Everyone knows what a sauna is, but what is a far infrared sauna? Not so many people are familiar with infrared saunas and what they do.

A regular sauna, often known as a Finnish sauna or hot rock sauna, works by heating the air inside the sauna. Anyone who sits in the sauna is thereby heated as well, and the heating effect produces various benefits, including a feeling of wellbeing, de-stressing and relaxation. There are also many health benefits claimed for sauna use.

However a regular, or Finnish, sauna can get up to temperatures of 200 deg or above, and can be quite uncomfortable. Many do not like the sensation of overheating and heavy sweating that come from a while in a regular sauna. And this is usually accentuated by the use of water thrown on the rocks to increase the humidity.

However the number of people who swear by the benefits of saunas are testament to how successful they are.

But there is a new kid on the block. The infrared sauna, otherwise known as the far infrared sauna.

Everyone knows about infrared light, even if they don’t know it. Every time the sun comes out from behind a cloud and you feel that immediate heating effect you are sensing the effects of far infrared light.

Infrared is light that comes from the invisible part of the suns spectrum of light waves. It lies somewhere between visible light, and microwaves. Infrared light, or more specifically the far portion of the spectrum, heats us up, but the light in the near part of the infrared spectrum does not.

Infrared has been used in therapies for many years, most are familiar with the old “heat lamps” that use infra red technology. And infra red heating is used in hospital humidicribs. However it is now also used in saunas to produce a more “user friendly” sauna.

As the infrared light used in the sauna does not heat the air as is the case in traditional saunas there is not the same sensation of overheating. The infrared light heats the body in the same way that the sun does, and this is much more relaxing, not producing the same sensations of overheating and oversweating.

And many say that all the therapeutic health benefits of saunas are equally available from infra red saunas, in fact more so. And there are many many claimed health benefits from the use of saunas, including weight loss, cardiovascular improvements, improvements in skin conditions, loss of cellulite in women, reduction in blood pressure and lots more. Infrared therapies are certainly on the rise.

Not only that but unlike traditional Finnish saunas, infrared saunas can be made light, easy to pack up and totally portable, so you can take it along with you. Throw a portable infrared sauna in the car when you go away and take it with you.

If you’re handy you can even build your own infrared sauna, so there’s no excuse not to have one.

Get yourself an infrared sauna, it’s way better than a traditional one, and just as good for you.

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Five Questions You Have to Ask Your Acupuncturist!

Acupuncture works! But your experience with acupuncture will depend largely on the acupuncture provider that you choose.

You want to find an acupuncturist that best suits your needs. If you like and trust your practitioner, your encounter with acupuncture will be more positive.

You will also want to know about the acupuncturists training and experience and what to expect from the acupuncture treatment. The clearer you are about who it is that is treating you and exactly what the treatment entails, the more you will be able to relax during the acupuncture session and benefit from this ancient form of health care.

Determine your goals

Do you have a specific injury or complaint or do you want to try acupuncture to balance body, mind and spirit? Are you looking for a primary health care practitioner, or someone to work in conjunction with your current physician?

Here are some questions that you should ask when choosing an acupuncturist.

  • Where was he or she trained to practice Oriental Medicine?
  • How long was the training?
  • How long has he or she been in practice as an acupuncturist?
  • What experience does he or she have in treating your specific ailment?
  • Is he or she licensed?

What Qualifications to look for when Choosing an Acupuncturist

Today acupuncture is an acknowledged and respected field of medicine. In most States, provinces and countries formal training and certification is required in order to practice.

The United States has set rigorous training standards for acupuncturists. Most states require a 3-5 year Masters degree in Oriental Medicine from an accredited acupuncture school and issue a written and practical state board exam before an acupuncturist can become licensed.

In the states that do not require licensing, choose an acupuncturist certified by the National Commission for the Certification of Acupuncturists. Its members have a degree in Oriental Medicine from an accredited school-or have worked as an apprentice acupuncturist for at least four years – and have passed both a written and practical exam. Acupuncturists who have passed this exam are entitled to add Dipl. Ac. (Diplomate of Acupuncture) or Dipl. O.M.. (Diplomate of Oriental Medicine) after their name.

Acupuncture requirements for Western doctors are generally more lenient than for non-MD’s. Choose a physician who also a licensed acupuncturist (L.Ac.). If there are none near you be sure that the M.D. or D.O. is a member of the American Academy of Medical Acupuncture; it requires a minimum of 200 hours of training for membership.

Veterinary acupuncture is considered a surgical procedure that, legally, may ONLY be performed by a licensed doctor of veterinary medicine.

Ask About Treatment Styles

Acupuncture and Herbology encompass several distinctive styles. Korean acupuncture, for example, primarily uses points on the hand, while Japanese acupuncture calls for fewer and finer needles inserted at shallower depths.

There is no evidence that one particular style is more effective than another, but you should know what you are getting into.

Discuss Length of Treatment

Decide in advance what your expectations are and discuss them with your acupuncturist in Dublin. A chronic illness may need several months of acupuncture treatment to have a noticeable effect. If you are not happy with your progress, think about changing acupuncturists or check with your western doctor for advice about other options.

You Can Get Insurance From A Private Company

There are so many types of insurance out there: car insurance, health insurance, and renters insurance are just a few types. How do you decide which type of insurance you need? How much should it all cost? Read the advice and suggestions in this article to learn which insurances you need and how to get the best rates.

If you receive your homeowner’s insurance from a company that also sells health or auto insurance, consider combining your policies. Many companies offer bundled discounts, so if you combine policies you could save a considerable amount.

If you are moving, be sure to check with your moving company to see what kind of insurance they carry. Most moving companies just have a “per-pound” policy on all contents. This might be alright if you just have fairly ordinary, large furnishings; however, if you have very expensive furniture, artwork, lots of electronics or other items that may not weigh much but are valuable, you should ask your insurance agent about supplemental moving insurance.

To save money on insurance, you should shop around and find out how different companies will discount for multiple policies for the same household. Most companies offer a standard 10% discount for placing all of your business with them but some firms will be able to make larger concessions.

If you own a small business, make sure you have the right insurance. An insurance should cover any damages that your employees might accidentally cause to your customers, as well as the value of the building and inventory. A small business insurance can be quite expensive, but is absolutely necessary.

Save money by shopping around for insurance. Most people tend to renew their insurance policy over and over, rather than looking for a better deal elsewhere. This can potentially save you hundreds of dollars, so it is worth it to take some time and shop around for the best price.

Get your auto and homeowner coverage from the same insurance company. When you do this you will get a better deal on both policies than you would if you bought each policy separately. This will also help you to build a better relationship with your agent, which can come in handy if something happens where you need to use your Medicare plan G.

Always do your homework. Make sure, the insurance company and broker you are planning to work with is licensed, insured and covered by the state’s guarantee fund. Your state’s insurance commissioner or department can provide this information for free. This ensures that, in case of an insurance company default, your claim will still be paid.

Avoid making monthly payments and instead pay your premium on an annual basis to save up to 60 dollars a year. Most companies charge between 3 to 5 dollars a month if you are paying every month. Put your money aside, and make the payment once a year or every six months instead of paying the extra fee.

If you want to save a large amount on your insurance, you should increase your deductibles. If you don’t plan on filing any claims in the future, then you’ll never have to pay the deductible to process a claim. In the meantime, you’ll be saving as much as 15% to 30% on your premiums.

Medicare

To keep the cost of travel insurance down you should check to see what your current health insurance plan would cover. Some policies, and Medicare, don’t offer any coverage if you are outside of the United States and territories, others may only cover the a fixed amount for an accident but nothing for sickness that requires hospitalization.

If you are a senior, consider long term care insurance. Long term care insurance will cover your expenses, should you end up in a nursing home. This can allow you to choose the nursing home you want, rather than depend on those that will accept Medicare or Medicaid.

Insurance is the best way to financially protect yourself. But with so many insurance types and an overload of information, it can be hard to know where to start. Use the advice you’ve learned in this article and get the insurance you need to protect yourself.